1969 moon landing anniversary.

This topic contains 53 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Laughing Lenny 21 hours, 4 minutes ago.

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  • #1771385
    MacGuffin
    MacGuffin
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    • :

    Often with old “songs” the lyrics and music were composed separately and put together at a later date. This is common for anthems (Star Spangled Banner, God Save the Queen). The lyrics were often poems (ie rhymes) intended to be spoken with a rhythm.

    And most of the nursery rhymes were about historical events (usually bad) that started off as almost playground chants. Ring a ring of roses is about the plague. Humpty Dumpty is about Cardinal Wolsey, Grand old Duke of York is obvious.

    It is only relatively recently with the advent of electronic music (CDs, musical toys) that nursery rhymes have recognisable music. And when choosing music for lyrics classics are a popular choice for the simple reason there is no copyright. This is why most adverts have a classical piece as their soundtrack.

    Isn’t it great that sometimes it’s little things like that can still blow your mind…
    It all depends on the wattage of the mind involved !

    #1771407

    Laughing Lenny
    Participant
    • :

    Mac. I can’t say what wattage his mind was, but John Lennon’s mind was already blown as a kid by avidly reading Lewis Carroll. His mind was still blown when he came out with things like cellophane flowers, marmalade skies, rocking horse people and Lucy’s diamonds in the sky, never mind the semolina pilchard!

    Twinkle Twinkle elementary penguin.
    Lenny.

    #1771462

    nine nine nine
    Moderator
    • :

    Lennon and McCartney were the Rodgers and Hammerstein of their day.

    #1772273

    Laughing Lenny
    Participant
    • :

    Nine. I don’t think that Rodgers & Hammerstein are the right comparison for Lennon & McCartney at all.

    Hardly any of the Beatles early stuff, or their latter material for that matter resemble anything much that R & H ever did. What have the likes of “Love Me Do” or “From Me To You” got in common with any R & H composition?

    Okay, perhaps during the Fabs latter years, “Everybody’s Got Something To Hide Except For Me And My Monkey” might very loosely resemble “High On A Hill There’s A Lonely Goats Heard”, but even those two clunkers are not really fit for any serious musical scrutiny unless you’re into the lyrical animal connection.

    Bacharach & David are slightly closer to the mark, albeit still a long way off, in my humble opinion.

    Lenny.

    #1772275

    nine nine nine
    Moderator
    • :

    “Battle hardened in the clubs of Hamburg, the fab four transformed from squeaky-clean pop sweethearts to rock monsters during the course of their career, and produced some of the best music ever made along the way. They constantly pushed boundaries, took their sound to places you’d never think possible and together with pioneering producer George Martin used the studio as an instrument unlike ever before. Their story and their music is legendary, and you just can’t look past them as the greatest British rock band of all time.” Evening Standard.

    Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Artists of all time.

    2004 — 50 years after Elvis Presley walked into Sun Studios and cut “That’s All Right” — Rolling Stone celebrated rock & roll’s first half-century in grand style, assembling a panel of 55 top musicians, writers and industry executives (everyone from Keith Richards to ?uestlove of the Roots) and asking them to pick the most influential artists of the rock & roll era. The resulting list of 100 artists, published in two issues of Rolling Stone in 2004 and 2005, and updated in 2011, is a broad survey of rock history, spanning Sixties heroes (the Beatles) and modern insurgents (Eminem), and touching on early pioneers (Chuck Berry) and the bluesmen who made it all possible Howlin Woolf.

    In both versions of the list, the top three positions are held by The Beatles, Bob Dylan, and Elvis Presley; rounding out the top ten (in descending order) are The Rolling Stones, Chuck Berry, Jimi Hendrix, James Brown, Little Richard, Aretha Franklin, and Ray Charles.

    In 2011, Rolling Stone published a revised edition of the list, with changes from the 27th position onward. The updated list features artists not present in the original (including Queen, Metallica, Pink Floyd, Talking Heads, R.E.M., Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Jay-Z), while removing a number of other artists (including Etta James, Miles Davis, Roxy Music, N.W.A., and Martha & The Vandellas).

    The list consists primarily of American or British artists, with the following exceptions: AC/DC (Australia), The Band (Canada/US), Bob Marley (Jamaica), Joni Mitchell (Canada), Lee “Scratch” Perry (Jamaica; only in the 2005 list), Carlos Santana (Mexico/US), U2 (Ireland), and Neil Young (Canada).[citation needed] Tina Turner, who relinquished her American citizenship after obtaining Swiss citizenship in 2013, was still an American citizen when included in the list.

    Most artists on the list were active in the 1960s and 1970s.

    Definitive Lenny on all counts!😊

    #1772944

    Laughing Lenny
    Participant
    • :

    “Definitive Lenny on all counts”!

    Yes Nine, I agree with most of your quoted volitions, but what does it have to do with your surprising assertion that Lennon and McCartney are up there with Rodgers & Hammerstein? Surely they went way well beyond that!

    That said, there were many brilliant mainstream songwriter pairings back then: Carole King & Gerry Goffin, Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller, and a little later, Benny Andersson and Bjorn Ulvaeus to name but three. And let’s not forget the brilliant Holland Dozier Holland who churned out endless amounts of great songs for almost every major artist at the amazing prolific Motown factory.

    I heard that today is the 50th anniversary of the release of “Abbey Road”. Time flies and in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.

    Far out man!
    Lenny.

    #1773222

    nine nine nine
    Moderator
    • :

    “It was 50 years ago today
    Sergeant Pepper taught the band to play
    They’ve been going in and out of style
    But they’re guaranteed to raise a smile
    So may I introduce to you
    The act you’ve known for all these years?
    Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”

    Lennon/McCartney/nine,nine,nine.😊

    #1773930

    Laughing Lenny
    Participant
    • :

    Nine, it was actually 52 years today, but what the hell. The Beatles were great. They took popular music to another place.

    The best albums the Beatles ever recorded in my opinion were: A Hard Day’s Night (during Beatle-mania), they were great crafted and performed songs. And you can actually hear they were up for it!

    Rubber Soul (during their period of transition) and then Revolver are both terrific.
    Sgt. Pepper if only for its seismic shift in popular music taste. In retrospect though, the music itself is sometimes wanting and devoid of any real feeling whatsoever. I can’t listen to it anymore.

    After that, well take your pick. The White Album has its moments but has quite a few clunkers on it too. I think it was by then simply a mixture of too many drugs and nasal gazing by the fab four.

    Abbey Road became their fantastic swansong mainly because George raised the bar from mediocrity with two brilliant songs.

    I actually bought the whole of their 3-part anthology and have played it once!

    I think without doubt the most innovative album ever made back then was Brian Wilson’s “Pet Sounds”. Ask Eric Clapton!

    Lenny.

    #1773936

    nine nine nine
    Moderator
    • :

    Lenny, don’t think so mate.

    “1969 album Abbey Road will be reissued for its 50th anniversary in September. All six physical formats offer a brand new Giles Martin (& Sam Okell) stereo mix and for the first time all the bonus sessions are available on vinyl and CD. Full format details below…”

    “We come on the Sloop John B
    My grandfather and me
    Around Nassau town we did roam
    Drinking all night
    Got into a fight
    Well I feel so broke up
    I want to go home”

    Good band and a very well rated Album.

    I’m a massive fan of Clapton and Cream and was lucky enough to meet him in Japan but we’re a long way from the Moon Landing now.😊

    #1773972

    Laughing Lenny
    Participant
    • :

    I’m aware that Abbey Road is 50 years old Nine but you seemed to infer that Sgt Pepper was, which it isn’t. You’re right that we have veered a long way off from the moon landing though. That said, which moon landing were you alluding to? The rumoured one, or the real one that was filmed in an old disused aircraft hangar in the middle of the Arizona desert?
    Lenny.

    #1773986

    nine nine nine
    Moderator
    • :

    Lenny, my Sergeant Pepper verse was to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Abbey Road Album. Keep up.😊

    If the USA has managed to keep the circa 400,000 involved in the Moon landing quiet about it being a hoax for 50 years they’ve done a remarkable job with not one of them breaking ranks.

    In fact it would probably be an even higher achievement than landing on the Moon.

    On the other hand …….! 😊

    #1774166

    Laughing Lenny
    Participant
    • :

    Just a minute Nine, are you seriously trying to tell me that your verse: “It was 50 years ago today, Sgt. Pepper taught the band to play” etc , etc, was to commemorate the anniversary of Abbey Road? … Got to be a joker who just does as he please…

    Because the world is round and turns you on does not negate the fact that there are numerous people all over the planet who still believe it is flat. It’s estimated that well over a million people still believe that Elvis is still alive, and don’t forget the hoards and hoards of people who kept quiet about the holocaust and were quite happy to carry that weight for the rest of their lives.

    Walrus Gumboots,
    Lenny.

    #1774179

    nine nine nine
    Moderator
    • :

    Lenny, putting aside the hundreds of thousands of people involved in the Moon landings and the fact the US would have somehow needed to restrain any of them from confirming the Moon landings were a hoax over a period of 50 years a task probably even more impossible than landing on the Moon itself. Where the deaths of Gus Grissom and the first Apollo crew a hoax too Lenny the first mission of the Apollo Moon landing programme or the near disaster of Apollo 13 led by Jim Lovell which couldn’t make their planned Moon landing and almost cost the lives of all three Astronauts.

    If you think the first Moon landing was a hoax Lenny no worries that’s your opinion mate and I respect your opinion but I don’t think it was a hoax.

    I doubt I will be able to change your opinion and you certainly won’t be able to change my opinion that it wasn’t a hoax.

    I’m going to leave it there now it’s been a blast but it’s run out of Rocket fuel now buddie.😊

    Good thread though Lenny. Until the next time. Cheers 9’s

    #1775733

    Laughing Lenny
    Participant
    • :

    Nine. Sorry for the delay in responding, I’ve been abroad for the last few days.
    I think that the main reason that this thread has run out of rocket fuel is because it is seriously haemorrhaging posters.
    As far as I can see, there are only effectively four premiership clubs still supported on here who can be bothered to post! The rest of the English Football League no longer exist. So where have they all gone to?
    The moon?
    Lenny.

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